Trait Characteristics

Maturity:

A subjective evaluation of the number of days from planting to the time when 50% of the plants have reached physiological maturity.

Physiological maturity is when the pods in the bottom two thirds of the main raceme have changed colour to black.

3 = Early, 4 = Early-mid, 5 = Mid, 6 = Late

Grain oil content:
Ratings indicate the relative amount of oil in the grain.

1 to 9 score, A one score difference represents approximately 0.5% difference in grain oil content.

Plant vigour:

Record when plants are in the 4 to 6 leaf stage.

A subjective evaluation of the ‘healthiness’ of plants and plant development [no. of leaves & the soil surface area covered].

1 to 9 score. As the seedling vigour increases the score increases to 9.  

Plant height:

Recorded at physiological maturity (time for windrowing) or at harvest maturity. Measure of average height in centimeters for a group of plants using a measuring stick

1 to 9 score. As the plant height increases the score decreases.  

Crop standability:

A subjective measure of the plants ability to withstand lodging under the weight of its own yield whilst withstanding environmental stresses such as wind, rain and hail.

1 to 9 score. As the standability increases the score increases to 9.  

Shatter tolerance:

A subjective measure of the plants ability to withstand shattering under environmental stresses such as wind, rain and hail.

1 to 9 score. As the shatter tolerance increases the score increases to 9. 

Grain test weight:

Grain test weight is a measure of the density of grain. It measures how much a specific volume of grain weighs.

1 to 9 score. As the grain test weight increases the score increases to 9. 

Blackleg rating:

Blackleg rating is an industry rating derived from % plant survival and % internal infection.

Varieties with “MR” blackleg rating or above are suitable in high risk situations; “MS” and “MS-MR” ratings are suitable in medium risk areas. 

Blackleg grouping:

Blackleg groups are based solely on the presence of seedling resistance (Rlm) genes. 

Over reliance on one cultivar can significantly increase the blackleg pathogen’s ability to overcome this resistance.  Resistance groups and cultivars do not need to be changed every year.

Sustainability of genetic resistance based on stacking of individual Rlm genes is highly questionable. Using canola cultivars that belong to multiple seedling resistance groups pose increased risks in rotation resistance groups and of the blackleg fungus evolving a higher level of virulence causing breakdown of multiple seedling Rlm resistance groups.

Pioneer hybrids deploy a combination of qualitative (seedling) and quantitative (adult) blackleg resistance.  Quantitative resistance significantly contributes to durable in-field resistance and protecting the yield potential of varieties being grown.